Civil Engineering (English)
Bachelor TR-NQF-HE: Level 6 QF-EHEA: First Cycle EQF-LLL: Level 6

General course introduction information

Course Code: CORE304
Course Name: High Intermediate Academic Spoken English
Course Semester: Spring
Course Credits:
Theoretical Practical Credit ECTS
2 2 3 4
Language of instruction: EN
Course Requisites:
Does the Course Require Work Experience?: No
Type of course: Foreign Language Elective
Course Level:
Bachelor TR-NQF-HE:6. Master`s Degree QF-EHEA:First Cycle EQF-LLL:6. Master`s Degree
Mode of Delivery: Face to face
Course Coordinator : Öğr.Gör. ZEYNEP GÜLER
Course Lecturer(s): Öğr.Gör. VOLGA KURBANZADE
Öğr.Gör. B.Öğretim Elemanı
Öğr.Gör. HANEN NAZ ANDAÇ
Öğr.Gör. BURÇİN YAŞAR PAKKAN
Course Assistants:

Course Objective and Content

Course Objectives: To improve students' Listening and Speaking skills
Course Content: This upper-intermediate course is a follow-up to CORE 303 and it aims to endow students with progress in their listening ability by providing instruction on active listening including interpretation, comprehension of both lectures and interviews, engagement with student dialogues, interpreting and explaining mind maps, and interacting effectively with diagrams. Expressive skills are enhanced through the study of analogies, participation in debate, paraphrasing and scripting, extended brainstorming techniques, use of persuasive language, and referencing of external materials in their language production process.

Learning Outcomes

The students who have succeeded in this course;
Learning Outcomes
1 - Knowledge
Theoretical - Conceptual
2 - Skills
Cognitive - Practical
3 - Competences
Competence to Work Independently and Take Responsibility
Field Specific Competence
Learning Competence
Communication and Social Competence
1) Students can infer attitude and mood in discussions by using contextual, grammatical and lexical cues. They can give a simple presentation on an academic topic in their field.
2) Students can understand the use of hypothetical situations in a linguistically complex discussion or debate. They can express views clearly and evaluate hypothetical proposals in informal discussions. They can talk about hypothetical events and actions, and their possible consequences.
3) Students can relate information in a presentation to the same information given in graphs, charts and tables. They can interpret the purpose of content of visuals (e.g. diagrams, charts) used to support an academic lecture or presentation.
4) Students can use a variety of linking words efficiently to mark clearly the relationships between ideas. They can recognise that a speaker has paraphrased ideas in a simple presentation or lecture.
5) Students can suggest solutions to problems and explain why they would work. They can identify details that support a point of view when taking part in a general discussion. They can identify personal bias and a speaker's bias in a presentation or lecture. They can shift between formal and informal registers as and when required.
6) Students can summarise information from several simple academic texts. They can carry out a prepared interview, checking and confirming information as necessary. They can carry out an effective, fluent interview, spontaneously following up on interesting replies.
7) Students can recognise cause and effect relationships in a linguistically complex presentation or lecture when signalled by discourse markers. They can construct a chain of reasoned argument. They can develop an argument giving reasons in support of or against a particular point of view. They can develop an argument well enough to be followed without difficulty most of the time.
8) Midterm Week
9) Students can critically evaluate the main points of a straightforward presentation or lecture. They can speculate about causes, consequences or hypothetical situations. They can recognise that a speaker is clarifying points they have made in a linguistically complex presentation or lecture.
10) Students can suggest pros and cons when discussing a topic, using linguistically complex language. They can identify logical flaws in a presentation or lecture. They can effectively chair a debate, managing contributions and reaching a conclusion.
11) Students can recognise that a speaker has paraphrased ideas in a linguistically complex presentation or lecture. They can initiate, maintain and end discourse naturally with effective turn-taking. They can signal a review or revision of assumptions during a discussion, using common discourse markers.
12) Students can introduce a new perspective on the topic of a discussion. They can identify details that support a point of view when taking part in a general discussion. They can give the advantages and disadvantages of various options on a topical issue. They can suggest alternatives to hypothetical proposals in a general discussion.
13) Students can take part in routine formal discussions conducted in clear standard speech in which factual information is exchanged. They can generally follow rapid or extended speech, but may require repetition or clarification.
14) Students can identify the use of clarification language in a linguistically complex presentation or lecture. They can describe an everyday consumer-related problem and request a correction or solution. They can understand the main ideas of complex technical discussions in their field.
15) Students can understand the main points of complex and abstract presentations in their field. They can introduce a new topic during a formal discussion. They can develop an argument on an academic topic, including supporting points and relevant examples.
16) Final Week

Lesson Plan

Week Subject Related Preparation
1) Focus on Listening: p. 5 / Listening 1: Choosing the Right Path p. 2-14 / Listening 3 (Video): One day in the Life: Six jobs p. 21-26 Course Book
2) Focus on Speaking: p. 19-20 / Warm-up Assignment: p.21 / Academic Survival Skill p. 13-14 Course Book
3) Focus on Listening: p. 31 / Listening 1: The Best Way to Learn p. 28-36 / Listening 3 (Video): Harnessing the Power of Brain Plasticity p. 42- 46 Course Book
4) Academic Survival Skill p. 40-41 / Focus on Speaking: p. 46-47 / Warm-up Assignment: p. 42 Course Book
5) Focus on Listening: p. 53 / Listening 1: Understanding Propaganda p. 50-59 / Listening 3: (Video) p. 66-69 Course Book
6) Focus on Speaking: p. 64-65 / Warm-up Assignment: p. 65 / Academic Survival Skill: p. 70-71 Course Book
7) Focus on Listening: p. 77 / Listening 1: Creating Your Brand p. 78- 83 / Listening 3: Fake Online Reviews (Video): p. 91-94 / Focus on Speaking: p. 88-90 Course Book
8) Midterm Week
9) Focus on Critical Thinking: p. 77-78 / Focus on Accuracy: p. 83-84 / Academic Survival Skill: p. 94-96 / Warm-up Assignment: p. 90 Course Book
10) Focus on Listening: p. 122-123 / Listening 1: The Scientific Method p. 101-104 / Listening 3: One on One: Bob McDonald (Video): p .114-118 / Focus on Speaking: p. 111-112 Course Book
11) Focus on Accuracy: p. 104-106 / Focus on Critical Thinking: p. 106-107 / Warm-up Assignment: p. 112-113 / Academic Survival Skill: p. 113-114 Course Book
12) Focus on Listening: p. 122-123 / Listening 1: Prime Secrets p. 125-128 / Listening 3: Too Much Math, Too Little History (Video): p. 137-140 / Focus on Speaking: p. 134-136 Course Book
13) Focus on Critical Thinking: p. 123-124 / Focus on Accuracy: p. 128- 130 / Academic Survival Skill: p. 141-142 / Warm-up Assignment: p. 136 Course Book
14) Focus on Listening: p. 147 / Listening 1: Your AI Future p. 149-153 / Listening 3 (Video): AI on the Brink p. 160-165 / Focus on Speaking: p. 165-166 / Focus on Accuracy: p. 158-159 / Academic Survival Skill: p. 153-154 / Warm-up Assignment: p. 160 Course Book
15) Focus on Listening: p. 171 / Listening 1: Food Security, World Security p. 172-176 / Listening 3 (Video): Agriculture and Africa's Promise p. 183-187 / Focus on Speaking: p. 181-182 / Focus on Accuracy: p. 176-178 / Academic Survival Skill: p. 187-188 / Warm-up Assignment: p. 183 Course Book
16) Final Week

Sources

Course Notes / Textbooks: Pearson LEAP 3 Upper-intermediate Academic Listening and Speaking
References: Online materials and worksheets

Course-Program Learning Outcome Relationship

Learning Outcomes

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16

Program Outcomes
1) Adequate knowledge in mathematics, science and engineering subjects pertaining to the relevant discipline; ability to use theoretical and applied information in these areas to model and solve engineering problems.
2) Ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems; ability to select and apply proper analysis and modelling methods for this purpose.
3) Ability to design a complex system, process, device or product under realistic constraints and conditions, in such a way so as to meet the desired result; ability to apply modern design methods for this purpose. (Realistic constraints and conditions may include factors such as economic and environmental issues, sustainability, manufacturability, ethics, health, safety issues, and social and political issues according to the nature of the design.)
4) Ability to select and use modern techniques and tools needed for analyzing and solving complex problems encountered in engineering practice; ability to employ information technologies effectively.
5) Ability to design and conduct experiments, gather data, analyze and interpret results for investigating complex engineering problems or discipline specific research questions.
6) Ability to work efficiently in intra-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary teams; ability to work individually.
7) Ability to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing; knowledge of a minimum of one foreign language; ability to write effective reports and comprehend written reports, prepare design and production reports, make effective presentations, and give and receive clear and intelligible instructions.
8) Recognition of the need for lifelong learning; ability to access information, to follow developments in science and technology, and to continue to educate him/herself.
9) Knowledge on behavior according ethical principles, professional and ethical responsibility and standards used in engineering practices.
10) Knowledge about business life practices such as project management, risk management, and change management; awareness in entrepreneurship, innovation; knowledge about sustainable development.
11) Knowledge about contemporary issues and the global and societal effects of engineering practices on health, environment, and safety; awareness of the legal consequences of engineering solutions.

Course - Learning Outcome Relationship

No Effect 1 Lowest 2 Low 3 Average 4 High 5 Highest
           
Program Outcomes Level of Contribution
1) Adequate knowledge in mathematics, science and engineering subjects pertaining to the relevant discipline; ability to use theoretical and applied information in these areas to model and solve engineering problems.
2) Ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems; ability to select and apply proper analysis and modelling methods for this purpose.
3) Ability to design a complex system, process, device or product under realistic constraints and conditions, in such a way so as to meet the desired result; ability to apply modern design methods for this purpose. (Realistic constraints and conditions may include factors such as economic and environmental issues, sustainability, manufacturability, ethics, health, safety issues, and social and political issues according to the nature of the design.)
4) Ability to select and use modern techniques and tools needed for analyzing and solving complex problems encountered in engineering practice; ability to employ information technologies effectively.
5) Ability to design and conduct experiments, gather data, analyze and interpret results for investigating complex engineering problems or discipline specific research questions.
6) Ability to work efficiently in intra-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary teams; ability to work individually.
7) Ability to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing; knowledge of a minimum of one foreign language; ability to write effective reports and comprehend written reports, prepare design and production reports, make effective presentations, and give and receive clear and intelligible instructions.
8) Recognition of the need for lifelong learning; ability to access information, to follow developments in science and technology, and to continue to educate him/herself.
9) Knowledge on behavior according ethical principles, professional and ethical responsibility and standards used in engineering practices.
10) Knowledge about business life practices such as project management, risk management, and change management; awareness in entrepreneurship, innovation; knowledge about sustainable development.
11) Knowledge about contemporary issues and the global and societal effects of engineering practices on health, environment, and safety; awareness of the legal consequences of engineering solutions.

Learning Activity and Teaching Methods

Expression
Brainstorming/ Six tihnking hats
Individual study and homework
Lesson
Group study and homework
Reading
Homework
Project preparation
Q&A / Discussion
Web Based Learning

Assessment & Grading Methods and Criteria

Written Exam (Open-ended questions, multiple choice, true-false, matching, fill in the blanks, sequencing)
Oral Examination
Homework
Group project
Presentation

Assessment & Grading

Semester Requirements Number of Activities Level of Contribution
Homework Assignments 5 % 20
Project 1 % 20
Midterms 1 % 20
Final 1 % 40
total % 100
PERCENTAGE OF SEMESTER WORK % 60
PERCENTAGE OF FINAL WORK % 40
total % 100

Workload and ECTS Credit Grading

Activities Number of Activities Workload
Course Hours 16 64
Study Hours Out of Class 16 16
Homework Assignments 16 16
Midterms 16 16
Final 16 16
Total Workload 128